Future Living

Do you work for your home or does your home work for you? Right now, probably the former, although future trends in home living definitely point to the latter.

A recent study by electronics company LG in Britain found that Brits on average spend just two hours a week on household chores thanks to technology. In 1953, they used to spend 63 hours a week. Improvements in washing machines, dishwashers, dryers and vacuum cleaners mean people spend less time with a mop in their hand, and most even expect to do no household work by the year 2033. In the study, people said they expected to have a refrigerator that will automatically order food online, a washing machine that could be switched on using a mobile phone and an oven that checks if food is burnt and turns itself off. I would love something that ironed for me. And made my bed.

A chore is a boring job which can take some time.

But besides appliances with bigger brains than you, many people want (and some already have) hyper-connected homes. Homes are equipped with ‘intelligent networks’ that automate basic tasks such as turning on and off the oven and taking care of the laundry by using mobile phones.

Another trend is often called responsive technology. Here, products with Internet connections provide greater convenience and efficiency to people’s lives by telling them about what’s happening inside their homes. One device bringing intelligence into the home is Nest. This is a thermostat connected through Wi-Fi that has a built-in light sensor to detect direct sunlight. It will then change the thermostat according to the amount of sunlight to save both money and energy.

Nest is useful and saves energy (and hence saves money). Some gadgets though seem a bit purposeless, but perhaps in this case I’m just not that into milk. Milkmaid is a milk jug with sensors that send SMS messages to its owners when the milk has almost run out or gone off. The plastic base the jug sits on texts a pre-designated mobile number whenever more milk needs to be bought.

Idiom: Here and now: It means the present, but it has the sense in the article of stressing what is being said is important.

I’ll admit it here and now – I rarely make my bed. I’m just going to mess it all up again in about 12 hours anyway, so why bother? If you are into new devices, Kickstarter is a great place to discover them. That’s where I discovered Smart Bedding. It says I’ll never have to make my bed again! And it also told me how much time I waste making my bed every day (well not really, cause I already admitted I rarely do). The makers of Smart Bedding figured out it takes around 90 seconds to make a bed with regular bedding. Making your bed with Smart Bedding takes less than 2 seconds. This adds up to 30 days in your life time.

Who thought that the ordinary home would become such a center of exciting technology?

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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A chore is a boring job which can take some time.

We spend quite a bit of time looking after our homes or that is how it feels. A recent study by electronics company LG in Britain found that Brits on average spend just two hours a week on household chores thanks to technology. In 1953, they used to spend 63 hours a week. Technological improvements mean people spend less time cleaning and maybe by 2033 they will not be cleaning much at all.

Some of the new inventions we could have are refrigerators which order food online and washing machines which can be switched on by a mobile phone. I would like a machine which made my bed.

Hyper-connected homes are another useful development. ‘Intelligent networks’ connect appliances and allow owners to switch them on and off with their phones.

Another trend is often called responsive technology. Here, products with Internet connections provide greater convenience and efficiency to people’s lives by telling them about what’s happening inside their homes. One device bringing intelligence into the home is Nest. This is a thermostat connected through Wi-Fi that has a built-in light sensor to detect direct sunlight. It will then change the thermostat according to the amount of sunlight to save both money and energy.

Idiom: Here and now: It means the present, but it has the sense in the article of stressing what is being said is important.

I’ll admit it here and now – I rarely make my bed. I’m just going to mess it all up again in about 12 hours anyway, so why bother? If you are into new devices, Kickstarter is a great place to discover them. That’s where I discovered Smart Bedding. It says I’ll never have to make my bed again! And it also told me how much time I waste making my bed every day (well not really, cause I already admitted I rarely do). The makers of Smart Bedding worked out it takes around 90 seconds to make a bed with regular bedding. Making your bed with Smart Bedding takes less than 2 seconds. This adds up to 30 days in your lifetime.

Who thought that the ordinary home would become such a center of exciting technology?

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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Future Living Quiz: Mild

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Do you work for your home or does your home work for you? Right now, probably the former, although future trends in home living definitely point to the latter.

A recent study by electronics company LG in Britain found that Brits on average spend just two hours a week on household chores thanks to technology. In 1953, they used to spend 63 hours a week. That sounds like way too much time unless you owned a castle or had some sort of cleaning disorder. Improvements in washing machines, dishwashers, dryers and vacuum cleaners mean people spend less time with a mop in their hand, and most even expect to do no household work by the year 2033. In the study, people said they expected to soon own a refrigerator that automatically placed online shopping orders, a washing machine that could be activated using a mobile phone and an oven that detects if food is burnt and turns itself off. They wouldn’t mind owning better fridges that keep food fresh, an ironing machine and, for one in four, a robotic butler. I would love something that ironed for me. And made my bed.

But besides appliances with bigger brains than you, many people are longing for (and some already have) hyper-connected homes. Homes are equipped with ‘intelligent networks’ that automate basic tasks such as turning on and off the oven and taking care of the laundry. The report from LG mentioned a couple appliances that have already been smartened up including a robotic vacuum cleaner which uses cameras and sensors to navigate around rooms and a refrigerator that suggests recipes based on what’s inside and knows when food is about to spoil.

Another trend is often referred to as responsive technology. Here, Internet-enabled products provide greater convenience and efficiency to people’s lives by informing them about what’s happening inside their homes. One device bringing intelligence into the home is Nest. This is a Wi-Fi enabled thermostat that has a built-in light sensor to detect direct sunlight. It will then adjust the thermostat accordingly to save both money and energy. The ‘Sunblock’ feature saves energy by preventing the home’s cooling or heating system from switching on when direct sunlight heats the surroundings, creating an inaccurate indication of temperature. There’s also a “Cool to Dry” feature that turns on the home’s air conditioning system when the humidity sensor inside the thermostat notices high humidity levels.

Any small useful machine, usually electronic, is a gadget.

Nest seems like it has a useful purpose and is an energy-saving (and hence money-saving) tool. Some gadgets though seem a bit purposeless, but perhaps in this case I’m just not that into milk. Milkmaid is a sensor-laden milk jug that sends SMS messages to owners when milk supplies are almost out or have gone off. Milkmaid monitors both milk quantity and food safety conditions and the plastic base it sits on texts a pre-designated mobile number whenever more milk needs to be bought. You can also utilize a corresponding iPhone app that provides instant access to milk supply information at any time.

Idiom: Here and now: It means the present, but it has the sense in the article of stressing what is being said is important.

I’ll admit it here and now – I rarely make my bed. I’m just going to mess it all up again in about 12 hours anyway, so why bother? If you are into new contraptions, Kickstarter is a great place to discover original ideas. Wanna-be inventors often post their ideas there in hopes of raising enough money to bring their products to market. That’s where I discovered Smart Bedding. It says I’ll never have to make my bed again! And it also told me how much time I waste making my bed every day (well not really, cause I already admitted I rarely do). The makers of Smart Bedding figured out it takes around 90 seconds to make a bed with regular bedding. Making your bed with Smart Bedding takes less than 2 seconds. Apparently you’ll save over 30 days over your life time with Smart Bedding. The project’s been successfully funded so an extra month of your life could soon be yours!

Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona

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