Great Sporting Tails

 

Friends, drinks, food on the grill – sounds like a typical weekend camping or at a cottage. However, if instead of grass there was a pavement parking lot and instead of a cottage it was the back of a truck, you’d be participating in the popular American pastime called tailgating.

Not even cold weather, or nightfall, will stop true tailgaters. Photo courtesy of killians1978 @Flickr

Before many sporting events start, especially American football games, people will meet in the parking lot outside the stadium with their portable grills, hot dogs and hamburgers and a cooler full of beer. The fans cook, eat, meet people nearby and usually talk about their team. People mostly wear a team sweater, team baseball hat, or at the minimum a shirt in their team’s colors. Fans of the visiting team often tailgate too, so friendly team bashing can become a popular conversation topic. Some people don’t even go to the stadium. Many prefer the comfort of their own folding chairs in the parking lot while watching the game on a television.

The term ‘tailgating’ comes from the word ‘tailgate’ – the part on the back of a pick-up truck that opens and allows access to the truck’s open back area. Now tailgate can be the verb for the activity or event itself. You don’t need to have a pick-up truck to tailgate; some people simply open the trunk of their car where there they have a cooler and all the proper equipment.

“The craziest tailgate I have ever been to was in Arizona,” said Jessica Collins, a student from San Diego, California. Her boss rented a large trailer, filled it with 20 kegs and set up a tailgate in the middle of the parking lot for the game. “So many people and so much beer in the heat of Arizona definitely made for a good time,” she said.

Tailgating is also big business. The Tailgating Industry Association estimates tailgating generates about $12 billion each year. An estimated 20 million people tailgate each year. The website Tailgating.com found that the average person tailgates six to 10 times a season and more than 40% spend more than $500 a year on food and supplies. Ms Collins says she tailgates about three or four times during her team’s home season.

For Ms. Collins tailgating is all about the tradition. “Hanging out and having a beer with close friends before the start of a football game – it doesn’t get much better than that.”

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

Great Sporting Tails Quiz: Medium

Start

Congratulations - you have completed Great Sporting Tails Quiz: Medium.

You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%.

Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%


Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
End
Return
Friends, drinks, food on the grill – sounds like a typical weekend camping or at a cottage. However, if there was a parking lot instead of grass and instead of a cottage, it was the back of a truck, you’d be participating in the popular American pastime called tailgating.

Before many sporting events, especially American football games, people will meet in the parking lot outside the stadium with their portable grills, food and beer. The fans cook, eat, meet each other and usually talk about their team. People mostly wear clothes with their team’s colors. Fans of the visiting team often tailgate too, so teasing the other team can become a popular conversation topic. Some people even prefer the comfort of their own folding chairs in the parking lot and watch the game on a television there.

The term ‘tailgating’ comes from the word ‘tailgate’ – the part on the back of a pick-up truck that opens. Now tailgate can be the verb for the activity or event itself. You don’t need to have a pick-up truck to tailgate; some people simply open the trunk of their car where there is a cooler and all the proper equipment.

“The craziest tailgate I have ever been to was in Arizona,” said Jessica Collins, a student from San Diego, California. Her boss rented a large trailer, filled it with 20 kegs of beer and set up a tailgate in the middle of the parking lot for the game.

Tailgating is big business. The Tailgating Industry Association estimates tailgating makes about $12 billion each year. Around 20 million people tailgate each year. The website Tailgating.com found that the average person tailgates six to 10 times a season and more than 40% spend more than $500 a year on food and supplies.

For Ms. Collins tailgating is all about the tradition. “Hanging out and having a beer with close friends before the start of a football game – it doesn’t get much better than that.”

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

Great Sporting Tails Quiz: Mild

Start

Congratulations - you have completed Great Sporting Tails Quiz: Mild.

You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%.

Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%


Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
End
Return
Friends, drinks, food on the grill – sounds like a typical weekend get together camping or at a cottage. Replace the grass with a pavement parking lot and the cottage with the back of a truck and you are now participating in the popular American pastime called tailgating. Prior to many sporting events, most often American football games, people will gather in the parking lot outside the stadium with their portable grills, hot dogs and hamburgers, a cooler full of beer, and their friends. Three to four hours before the game even starts, fans are out there, cooking, eating, meeting their “neighbors,” and usually talking about their team. Proper dress for these occasions is a team jersey, team baseball hat, or at the minimum a shirt in your team’s colors. Fans of the visiting team often pull up to tailgate too, so friendly team bashing can become a popular conversation topic.

Jessica Collins, a student from San Diego, California attended her first tailgating event at Arizona State University. She describes tailgating as “a party before an event.”

A parking lot, pre-game, filled with tailgaters. Photo courtesy of theblackdog2071 @Flickr

“Tailgating usually begins a few hours before the start of a game; some people will get there as soon as the stadium opens the parking lot, which is usually four or five hours before the game begins,” she said. “The typical set up is a car/truck parked and chairs set up around along with food and drinks.”

The term ‘tailgating’ comes from the word ‘tailgate’ – the part on the back of a pick-up truck that folds down and allows access to the truck’s bed. You don’t need to have a pick-up truck to tailgate; some people simply pop open the trunk of their car to reveal a cooler and all the proper paraphernalia they need. Some really do elevate tailgating to another level.

“The craziest tailgate I have ever been to was in Arizona,” said Ms Collins. “It was for a college football championship game and Ohio State was in town. My boss at the time was a huge Ohio State fan and he rented a U-haul (trailer used for moving), filled it with 20 kegs and set up a tailgate in the middle of the parking lot for the game. That tailgate was crazy! So many people and so much beer in the heat of Arizona definitely made for a good time.”

Not even cold weather, or nightfall, will stop true tailgaters. Photo courtesy of killians1978 @Flickr

But tailgating isn’t only about camaraderie– it’s big business. The Tailgating Industry Association estimates tailgating generates about $12 billion in revenue each year. Millions of people supposedly tailgate every year, with estimates running up to 20 million people. Research done by the website Tailgating.com found that the average person tailgates six to 10 times a season and more than 40% spend more than $500 a year on food and supplies. Ms Collins says she tailgates about three or four times during the professional American football team, the Chargers, 8-game home season.

And some people don’t even come to watch the game. Lots prefer the comfort of their own folding chairs in the parking lot while watching the game on a television they are powering with a generator. They’ve got their own tasty food and friends gathered around, so why not? Even Ms Collins admits to attending the pre-party and not the game.

“To me the allure of tailgating is the party and the tradition in it,” she said. “Telling stories about past tailgates and games makes me want to get out there and start tailgating again. Hanging out and having a beer with close friends before the start of a football game – it doesn’t get much better than that.”

Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona

Great Sporting Tails Quiz: Spicy

Start

Congratulations - you have completed Great Sporting Tails Quiz: Spicy.

You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%.

Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%


Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
6End
Return

Leave a comment





4 × = thirty six