Home is Where the Art is

Architect and interior designer John Saladino famously said, “A house is much more than a mere shelter, it should lift us emotionally and spiritually.” I think this is true. You want your home to be a place you enjoy spending time as well as a space where you can express yourself. But some people have the time, imagination and money to make ordinary homes extraordinary.

At first you might think this family home (main picture) in Mexico City was designed by Gaudi. It’s really the work of architect Javier Senosiain who specializes in creating buildings which look like living things. Nothing is straight or square and the white cement walls resemble the inside of a cave.
Steel House courtesy of Robert Bruno
You might think this home will walk away at any moment. Architectural sculptor and artist Robert Bruno has been at work on this house since 1974. He wanted it to look like a cross between an animal and machine, so the steel house sits on four skinny legs. The house is more like a sculpture than a home. Mr. Bruno has been adding pieces as he goes along.
Sliding House courtesy of dRMM Architects
It would be so lovely to have a home that takes advantage of warm, light summers but stays warm during the darker winter days. Welcome to the Sliding House in Suffolk, England designed by dRRM Architects. This home has a 20 ton outside shell that can open in about six minutes. Inside is a second glass ‘house.’ The owners can let the sun warm the house during the day and keep the heat inside at night.

Nowadays the word ‘green’ is synonymous with ‘environmentally-friendly’ or ‘ecological’.

Container City courtesy of Urban Space Management
Building green is popular right now, and many architects are turning existing structures into livable spaces. Container architecture is popping up all over the world with creative designers making the old shipping containers look fresh and new. One of the most well-known examples is London’s Container City. The complex is built in the Docklands area and the original 12 studio spaces took just five months to complete. Eighty percent of the building materials are recyclable.

Home sweet home is a popular saying in English. It’s often written on door mats.

airplane cropYou can kind of see the rationale behind converting a container to a living space – they are strong, and the shape is easy to work with. But people can take almost anything it seems and make it their home sweet home. Like a jet plane for instance. A number of people have made airplanes into homes. The one pictured is a former Boeing 727 in Mississippi.

All of these differ in their imaginative approach to living, yet are similar in one important way – a home can be as unique as the person who lives in it.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

 

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Home Is Where The Art Is Quiz: Medium

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Architect and interior designer John Saladino said, “A house is much more than a mere shelter, it should lift us emotionally and spiritually.” I think he is right. You want your home to be a place where you like to live and which shows who you are. Some people have the time, imagination and money to make very special homes.

Lift: This usually means to move something or pick something up physically. But it can also mean to make you feel better.

This family home (main picture) in Mexico City was designed by architect Javier Senosiain. He often makes buildings which look like living things. Nothing is straight and even.
Steel House courtesy of Robert Bruno
This one looks like it can walk. Architectural sculptor and artist Robert Bruno wanted his home to resemble an animal and a machine. He started the home in 1974. He is still building it now.
Sliding House courtesy of dRMM Architects
It’s nice if our homes are cool in summer and warm in winter. The Sliding House in Suffolk, England uses nature to stay at a good temperature. In the day, the outside cover is open so the sun can warm the glass house inside. At night they can close the cover and keep the house warm.
airplane crop
Ecological buildings are popular right now. Many architects use existing structures for their designs. Container architecture is one example and container buildings are appearing everywhere. One of the most well-known examples is London’s Container City. It took five months to finish. Eighty percent of the building materials are recyclable.

You can kind of see why an architect would use a container. It is the right shape for a home. But some people even make homes from old planes, like this Boeing 727 in Mississippi.

Homes can look like anything, but they all show the personality of the people who live there.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

 

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Home Is Where The Art Is Quiz: Mild

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“A house is much more than a mere shelter, it should lift us emotionally and spiritually.” Architect and interior designer John Saladino is quoted with saying that phrase and many people probably take it to heart. You want your home to be a place you enjoy spending time as well as a space where you can reveal your personality. Some people have the time, creativity and money to take the phrase ‘there’s no place like home’ to a whole other level.

Take to heart: If you take something to heart it means that you take it seriously.

You’d be forgiven for thinking this family home (main picture) in Mexico City was designed by Gaudi. It’s actually the work of architect Javier Senosiain who specializes in creating buildings shaped like living and natural things. No walls, floor or ceiling are parallel and that combined with the white cement walls give the home a cool cave-like atmosphere. Much of the furniture is custom-built into the space, adding to the spatial flow. Lots of stained glass and colorful tiles along with plants brighten the rooms and make for a fun interior.
Steel House courtesy of Robert Bruno
This one looks like it might walk off into the sunset at any moment. Architectural sculptor and artist Robert Bruno has been at work on this home since 1974. Wanting it to look like a cross between an animal and machine, the steel house is perched on four skinny legs, which doesn’t disrupt the earth like most homes do. Mr Bruno has approached the design more as a sculpture than a home, adding pieces as he goes along. The interior is more cathedral-like than homey and it doesn’t seem like an efficient use of space for living. No matter, steel is a long lasting and highly recyclable material making this object an eco-friendly design.
Sliding House courtesy of dRMM Architects
It would be so lovely to have a home that takes advantage of warm, light summers but retains its warm cozy interior during the darker winter days. Welcome to the Sliding House in Suffolk, England designed by dRRM Architects. This home has a 20 ton exterior shell that can be slid back in about six minutes revealing a second glass ‘house’ inside. The owners can take advantage of ‘free’ energy by soaking in the sun and light during the day and keeping the heat inside at night.

Green: Nowadays the word ‘green’ is synonymous with ‘environmentally-friendly’ or ‘ecological’.

Container City courtesy of Urban Space Management
Building green is hot right now, and many architects are taking inspiration from already built structures, repurposing them into livable spaces. Container architecture is popping up all over the world with creative designers breathing new life into old shipping containers. One of the most well-known examples is London’s Container City. Designed by Urban Space Management, the complex is built in the Docklands area and the original 12 studio spaces took just five months to complete, with 80% of the building materials coming from recyclable goods.

You can kind of see the rationale behind converting a container to a living space – they are durable, stackable and the shape is easy to work with. But people can take almost anything it seems and make it their home sweet home. Like a jet plane for instance. A number of people have converted airplanes into homes boasting at least one very tough exterior and one with very low maintenance costs. The one pictured is a former Boeing 727 now living out retirement in Mississippi.

airplane crop

All of these differ in their imaginative approach to living, yet are similar in one fundamental way – a home can be as individual as the person who lives in it.

Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona

 

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