Kuala Lumpur Combo

I’ve been to a few Asian cities but Kuala Lumpur is my favourite. The city might not be the hippy mecca that is Bangkok or the shopping paradise that is Hong Kong, but it is a great combination of Malay, Chinese and Tamil with a little Arabic and colonial British culture. It is this cosmopolitan blend which gives Kuala Lumpur its special feel.

On my first day I walked around starting from Merdeka (Independence) Square. My trip took me to Little India. Along the way I stopped at a market where I bought a cool hat and saw the most amazing bright blue flowers. In Little India I found a restaurant which I wanted to remember to try later. But I had to go back to the hotel to meet my dad who I was travelling with.

Dad doesn’t enjoying walking so he decided to relax at the hotel by the pool. Some might say he’s the more sensible of the two of us. But the second day, he was very excited about our trip because we were going to the Petronas Towers. The towers are the second tallest building in the world, standing over 400m. We could only go as far as the Sky Bridge but the view is pretty amazing, especially because it is free. Afterwards we went to the Indian restaurant I found the day before.

The outskirts of a city or town are the outer edges, not in the centre. We could also say the fringes of the city, or the suburbs, but suburbs often gives the impression of neighbourhoods.

On the third day dad went with me to the Kuala Lumpur bird park. I really like nature and birds, and both my dad and I had a good time. On the fourth day I went out alone. I think the excitement of the bird park was too much for my dad. My destination was the Batu Caves, a Hindu temple on the outskirts of town. The caves were an easy bus ride. But there was a strange pile of empty peanut shells left on a seat on the bus.

‘At large’ can mean loose or free. It is often used with criminals. ‘The bank robber escaped from jail and was at large somewhere in the city.’

The caves have been a place of worship since the late 19th century. Sadly, tourism has changed the area so it feels more like a theme park than a shrine. The caves are also home to a large and very bold monkey colony and I was very worried they might like my new hat. On the way back, there was again a pile of peanuts in my return bus. Either I was on the same bus, which really needed to be cleaned or there was a very messy eater at large in the city.

Our last destination was that night. Because my dad had kindly gone with me to the bird park, I went with him to the casino in the Genting Highland. Located far from the city centre, we had to take a taxi and then a cable car up to the hotel complex. The cable car took us up above the jungle-covered foothills. One of the passengers in the car with us said there were tigers below. I didn’t really believe him, but wasn’t going to go down and look for them either.

We did many things on this trip and I didn’t even mention all the wonderful meals we tried like grilled sting ray and barbecue squid and noodle soup with venison. The city just has so much to offer and I can’t wait to go back.

Original article by Ryan Scott – Sydney, Australia. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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Kuala Lumpur Combo Quiz: Medium

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Kuala Lumpur is my favourite Asian city. Bangkok and Hong Kong are both very popular but I like the cultural blend in Kuala Lumpur. You can find Malay, Chinese and Tamil and even Arabic and colonial British culture here.

‘Pretty’ as it is used here is a synonym for ‘very.’

I was travelling with my dad so we did some things together and some things I did by myself. I walked around alone on the first day to see the city. On the second day, my dad was very excited because we were going to the Petronas Towers. The towers are the second tallest building in the world and are over 400m. The view is pretty amazing.

The outskirts of a city or town are the outer edges, not in the centre. We could also say the fringes of the city, or the suburbs, but suburbs often gives the impression of neighbourhoods.

On the third day my dad and I went to the Kuala Lumpur bird park. I really like nature and birds, and both my dad and I had a good time. On the fourth day I went out alone to the Batu Caves, a Hindu temple on the outskirts of town. The caves have been a place of worship since the late 19th century. Sadly, tourism has changed the area so it feels more like a theme park than a shrine. The caves are also home to a large and very bold monkey colony.

Our last destination was that night. Because my dad had gone with me to the bird park, I went with him to a casino. I didn’t do very good and quickly lost all my money. We did many things on this trip. The city just has so much to offer and I can’t wait to go back.

Original article by Ryan Scott – Sydney, Australia. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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Kuala Lumpur Combo Quiz: Mild

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I’ve been to a few Asian cities but Kuala Lumpur is easily my favourite. The city might not be the hippy mecca that is Bangkok or the shopping paradise that is Hong Kong, but it is a rich melting pot of Malay, Chinese and Tamil with a hint of Arabic and colonial British culture thrown in. It is this cosmopolitan blend which gives Kuala Lumpur its distinct vibe.

On my first day I did a walk from Merdeka Independence Square. The square was where the Malaysian flag was hoisted for the first time, so it seemed a fitting place to start exploring. My trip took me through to Little India. Along the way I stopped at a market where I bought a cool hat and saw the most amazing bright blue flowers. In Little India I found a restaurant which I noted down for another time, but that day I was due back at the hotel to meet my dad who I was travelling with.

Dad isn’t much of a walker which is why he decided to relax at the hotel by the pool. Some might say he’s the more sensible of the two of us. But the second day, he was very excited about our trip because we were going to the Petronas Towers. The towers are the second tallest building in the world, standing over 400m. But we could only go as far as the Sky Bridge which connects the two towers at the 41st and 42nd floors. Even so, the view is pretty amazing. And well worth a trip given that entry is free, though you do have to queue in the morning. Afterwards we went to the Indian place I found the day before.

Daggy is an Australian English term for unfashionable, especially from a young person’s view.

On the third day dad indulged my love of nature and went with me to the Kuala Lumpur bird park. I know it’s quite daggy, but I’m very fond of avian wildlife. Maybe it’s because I want to fly or maybe I’m just attracted to colourful objects. At any rate, I had a good time and so did Dad. Most of the birds we saw were hornbill, a species of Malaysian tropical bird with enormous beaks. Just when I thought I’d seen one impressive specimen the next enclosure would have a hornbill with an even more mammoth protrusion. I guess beaks are in the bird world what yachts are in ours.

On the fourth day I went out alone. I think the excitement of the bird park was too much for my dad. My destination was the Batu Caves, a Hindu temple on the outskirts of town. The caves were an easy bus ride. The only concern was the pile of empty peanut shells left on a seat on the bus.

The caves themselves have been a place of worship since the late 19th century. Sadly, tourism has altered the area so it feels more like a theme park than a shrine. The caves are also home to a large and very bold monkey colony and I was constantly worried about my newly acquired hat. The area around the cave is home to Kuala Lumpur’s Tamil community, so after visiting them I was able to have a delicious and very cheap dhal for lunch, washed down with fresh coconut juice. On the way back, there was again a pile of peanuts in my return bus. Either I was on the same bus, which desperately needed a clean or there was a very messy eater at large in the city.

Our last destination was later that night. Seeing as dad had kindly accompanied me to the bird park, I went with him to the casino in the Genting Highland. Quite a way out of the city, we had to get a taxi and then a cable car up to the hotel complex which stood one kilometre above sea level. Because of the elevation, it could get quite cool, though the rest of Kuala Lumpur was swathed in humid air. The cable car took us high above the jungle-covered foothills. One of the passengers in the car with us claimed tigers were roaming below. I was sceptical, but at the same time I wasn’t going to hop out and try to prove him wrong.

If someone ‘bites their tongue’ we don’t mean literally. We mean they are trying not to say something out loud. ‘I had to bite my tongue when my boss said the company was doing great.’

This was my first time in a casino. I set aside for myself fifty dollars for the evening, which I promptly lost. My sheer ignorance at how to play roulette caused the croupier to bite her tongue with laughter. I was seeing pile after pile of chips disappear while the more experienced patrons, some of them old enough to be my grandparents, were adding to theirs. I think I decided this would be my last experience in a casino too.

As I’m writing this I realize that I’ve hardly mentioned all the wonderful meals we tried from grilled sting ray to barbecue squid and noodle soup with venison. The city just has so much to offer. I can’t wait to go back…though I’ll probably give the casino a miss.

Ryan Scott – Sydney, Australia

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Kuala Lumpur Combo Quiz: Spicy

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