More than the Easter Bunny

This is what I remember about Easter when I was a child in America: I would get a basket with a chocolate bunny, hard-boiled eggs, jellybeans (my favorite) and other small chocolate eggs and candy, as well as a small toy or other gift. The Easter Bunny, really my parents, used to hide both real and plastic eggs in the house or outside if the weather was fine. However, Easter Monday is not a public holiday in the US so the weekend was short.

Used to: We use this phrase to talk about an action repeated in the past which we no longer do.

The Easter Bunny and eggs were brought to the US by German immigrants. Rabbits and eggs are very old symbols of fertility. Most English speaking countries have similar traditions as in America, but the traditions in other countries are quite different.

In both Poland and Hungary, for example, there is a strong chance you will get wet. The activity is called Smingus-Dyngus in Poland. Boys try to wet the girls. However, if a girl gets wet then according to legend she will marry by the end of the year. In Hungary, men and boys spray perfume or perfumed water on the women and girls and playfully ask for a kiss.

In Norway, crime fiction is connected to Easter. Publishers actually release special ‘Easter Thrillers’ known as Paaskekrimmen. The tradition supposedly started in 1923 when a book publisher promoted its new crime novel on the front pages of newspapers. The ads looked so much like news that people didn’t know it was advertising. TV channels also run hours of detective shows.

Custom vs. habit: A custom is an activity repeated around special occasions and is part of a community. A habit is something more personal and can be associated with negative activities like smoking.

On the island of Corfu there’s a high likelihood of falling kitchenware hitting you. It’s tradition for the Greek island residents to throw out their old pots and pans on Easter Monday. The custom might have come from the Venetians who used to throw out all their old items on New Year’s Day.

Eggs play a large part in many Easter customs. In Central and Eastern Europe it is common to see painted eggs. In Germany, they even make Easter trees, hanging eggs on the branches. Interestingly in Greece, they only paint their eggs red. In the Netherlands, Belgium and France, church bells returning from Rome are said to bring the Easter eggs. Egg tapping or egg rolling games can be found in both Britain and the US.

In countries where there is a large Catholic population, the week before Easter is often a time of many celebrations, parades and more. In the Philippines, the crucifixion of Jesus is acted out every year. Surprisingly, a person is really nailed to a cross. The Church doesn’t approve of the celebration.

One Easter tradition that failed to start was the Easter Bilby. Some Australians wanted to improve the image of this small endangered marsupial that looks like a combination of a kangaroo, rat and rabbit. However, the Easter bunny remained popular.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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In America the typical Easter tradition is for children to receive chocolate eggs and a chocolate bunny from the Easter Bunny. If the weather is fine, parents might hide eggs outside for children to find. However, Easter Monday is not a public holiday in the US so the weekend is short. Most English speaking countries have similar traditions, but the traditions in other countries are quite different.

In both Poland and Hungary, for example, men and boys will throw water at women and girls.  In Hungary, the water is often perfumed.

Are released: This is an example of the verb in the passive voice. We use the passive voice because who released the book is not important.

In Norway, special ‘Easter Thrillers’ known as Paaskekrimmen are released. The tradition supposedly started in 1923 when a book publisher put an ad for its new crime novel on the front pages of newspapers. People thought the ad was a real news story and the tradition continued from there.

On the island of Corfu falling kitchenware might hit you. It’s tradition for the people on the Greek island to throw out their old pots and pans on Easter Monday.

Eggs are common in Easter customs. You will usually see painted eggs in Central and Eastern Europe. In Germany, they even hang eggs on the branches of Easter Trees. Interestingly in Greece, they only paint their eggs red. In the Netherlands, Belgium and France, church bells returning from Rome are said to bring the Easter eggs. Egg tapping or egg rolling games can be found in both Britain and the US.

One Easter tradition that failed to start was the Easter Bilby. Some Australians wanted to improve the image of this small endangered marsupial that looks like a combination of a kangaroo, rat and rabbit. However, the Easter bunny remained popular.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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Easter, while one of the most important holidays in Christianity, is also seen as an occasion which heralds spring. A day off in some countries, perhaps a family meal and fun activities for the kids – the holiday and its traditions vary greatly around the world. When I first moved to the Czech Republic, I found the tradition of pomlázky to be one of the stranger ones. As a child, I was used to waking

A day off: A day not at work which is not the weekend.

Easter Sunday morning to an Easter basket outside my bedroom door. Inside would be a chocolate bunny, hard-boiled eggs we had colored the day before, jellybeans (my favorite) and other small chocolate eggs and candy, as well as a small toy or other gift. The Easter Bunny, a.k.a. my parents, would hide both real and plastic eggs in the house or outside, depending on the weather, for us kids to find. We’d go to church and have a big meal, usually ham. Easter Monday is not a public holiday in the US so the weekend was short.

The Easter Bunny and eggs were brought to the US by German immigrants. The tradition is rooted in the pagan belief that rabbits and eggs symbolize fertility. This tradition is now common throughout the English speaking world. While many countries’ Easter traditions can be connected to fertility and the coming spring season, some are almost as memorable as the pomlázky.

To run the risk: This phrase means that you do something which creates a greater possibility of risk. ‘If you drive too fast, you run the risk of getting a speeding ticket.’

In both Poland and Hungary, for example, you run the risk of getting wet. Called Smingus-Dyngus in Poland, it usually involves boys trying to drench the girls. However, if a girl is lucky enough to get a bucket dumped on them legend has it she will marry within the year. In Hungary, it’s a bit sweeter smelling at least as men and boys spray perfume or perfumed water on the females and playfully ask for a kiss.

Crime is highly associated with the holiday in Norway – specifically reading about it. Publishers actually come out with special ‘Easter Thrillers’ known as Paaskekrimmen. The tradition is said to have started in 1923 when a book publisher promoted its new crime novel on the front pages of newspapers. The ads resembled news so much that people didn’t know it was a publicity stunt. TV channels get into the spirit running hours of detective shows as well.

A Easter holiday spent in Corfu sounds nice – except for the fact there’s a high likelihood of you been injured by falling kitchenware. On Easter Monday, it’s tradition for the Greek island residents to throw out their old pots, pans and other earthenware. Out the window and smashed on the streets below, some say the custom derives from the Venetians who on New Year’s Day used to throw out all their old items.

Eggs play a large part in many Easter customs. In Central and Eastern Europe it is common to see painted eggs. In Germany, they even make Easter trees, hanging eggs on the branches. Interestingly in Greece, they only paint their eggs red. In the Netherlands, Belgium and France, church bells returning from Rome are said to bring the Easter eggs. Egg tapping or egg rolling games can be found in both Britain and the US. Haux, France though has some extra busy hens before Easter. The city traditionally cooks up a giant omelet with more than 4500 eggs. It is able to feed 1000 people. The tradition supposedly dates back to Napoleon times. The general and his army were travelling through the south of France when they stopped in a small town and had an omelet. Napoleon liked his so much he ordered all the townspeople to gather their eggs and make a huge one for his army the next day.

In countries where there is a large Catholic population, the week before Easter is often a time of many celebrations, parades and more. In the Philippines, the crucifixion of Jesus is reenacted every year. Discouraged by the Church, it involves the actual nailing to a cross of volunteers.

One Easter tradition that didn’t really catch on was the Easter Bilby. Typically in Australia, the Easter Bunny was the character to bring chocolate and hide the eggs. In an effort to create awareness for the bilby – an endangered species of small marsupial that looks like a combination of a kangaroo, rat and rabbit – was chosen to be the new mascot for the holiday. The popularity of the bunny though must have just been too much for the poor bilby to overcome.

Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona

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