Read on the Lines

With many books available in digital form, libraries around the world are seeing a few less members. Libraries have to use new technology to keep people interested. Three students from the Miami Ad School in the US designed a pilot project for the New York Public Library (NYPL) which aims to connect people with libraries, in a place where Smartphone access isn’t available: the subway.

“The idea was inspired through riding on the New York subway – the billboard (advertising the library) itself looks like bookshelves and we just imagined it would be neat if we can get a sample digital read from the poster,” Keri Tan, one of the partners in the project, told The Word.  The idea is something which would not have been possible five years ago.

Ms Tan, along with Max Pilwat and Ferdi Rodriguez, wanted to show New Yorkers that libraries are still relevant, even in today’s world of instant information. Ms Tan explained how the idea would work.

“The subway passengers encounter the Underground Library placement ads and they will be notified to use their NFC (Near Field Communication) devices to get a sample download of the best sellers,” she said.  “After they finish the first ten pages (and upon getting reception to their phone again), they will be notified of their closest library where they can borrow the book to finish it, in hope of bringing New Yorkers back to the library.”

Visit vs. attend: These two words are sometimes confused. We visit libraries, museums, our friends and the doctor. However we attend school and weddings.

New Yorkers are not the only people who need encouragement to visit their library. Visits across the US are down 1.1% according to the American Library Association. The Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy reported that the UK had 201 fewer libraries in 2011-2012 than the previous year and the number of visitors is also lower.

Collocation: place restriction: ‘The government placed restrictions on the number of fish people can catch.’

The decrease isn’t because fewer people read. Now, more people read on e-books. The American Library Association’s 2012 state of the libraries report found that more people want to borrow e-books, but libraries only have limited access to e-books because of restrictions placed on their use by publishers. The students’ project could solve this problem by using NFC.

“NFC enabled phones would be able to communicate with the RFID tag (radio frequency identification tags) placed within the subway ads.” Ms Tan explained. “The content would directly transfer to your phone upon contact. No WiFi or server is needed at the subway.”

While the group’s project has not been implemented, Ms Tan says they see a future for using this type of technology in places where people have no Internet access.

“There are a lot of institutions and brands that can benefit from a similar campaign – such as Barnes and Noble – different booksellers/publishing companies – or even Amazon E-books for Kindle Readers  – they can directly buy and download the entire book.”

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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Libraries need to change so that people will still use their services. Three students from the Miami Ad School in the US have a plan for the New York Public Library (NYPL) which lets people connect with libraries on the subway.

Neat is an American English use of the word, meaning ‘cool’ or ‘great’.

“The idea was inspired through riding on the New York subway – the billboard (advertising the library) itself looks like bookshelves and we just imagined it would be neat if we can get a sample digital read from the poster,” Keri Tan, one of the partners in the project, told The Word.

Ms Tan, along with Max Pilwat and Ferdi Rodriguez, wanted to show people in New York that libraries are still important even in the digital age.

“The subway passengers encounter the Underground Library placement ads and they will be notified to use their NFC (Near Field Communication) devices to get a sample download of the best sellers,” she said.  “After they finish the first ten pages (and upon getting reception to their phone again), they will be notified of their closest library where they can borrow the book to finish it, in hope of bringing New Yorkers back to the library.”

New York isn’t the only place where people go to the library less. The same problem is in the UK. New technology could be the answer. Many people want to borrow e-books from the library but the e-book publishers limit e-book use. The NFC technology means you don’t need Internet access.

“NFC enabled phones would be able to communicate with the RFID tag (radio frequency identification tags) placed within the subway ads. The content would directly transfer to your phone upon contact. No WiFi or server is needed at the subway.”

People riding on public transport more often than not are reading a newspaper, book or e-reader. The Underground Library gives Smartphone readers the chance to try a new book, and if they really like it, it shows them where they can read the next chapter.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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When was the last time you went to your local library? With the availability of downloadable reading material, many

A stack is a pile, but the plural stacks is used for the books on the library shelves.

libraries around the world are seeing a few less people browsing their stacks. Innovative libraries are embracing new technology to keep reading relevant in the digital age. The Word published an article last October taking a look at one of these 21st century libraries in the US. What if there was a way to introduce people to new books, while promoting the local library? Three students from the Miami Ad School in the US designed a pilot project for the New York Public Library (NYPL) which aims to connect people with libraries, in a place where Smartphone access isn’t available: the subway.

Neat is an American English use of the word, meaning ‘cool’ or ‘great’.

“We were asked to come up with an innovative way for NYPL to advertise that wouldn’t have been possible five years ago,” Keri Tan, one of the partners in the project, told The Word.  “The idea was inspired through riding on the New York subway – the billboard (advertising the library) itself looks like bookshelves and we just imagined it would be neat if we can get a sample digital read from the poster.”

Ms Tan, along with Max Pilwat and Ferdi Rodriguez, wanted to remind New Yorkers of the relevance of libraries, even in today’s world of ‘instant research’ via Smartphones. Ms Tan explained how the idea would work.

“The subway passengers encounter the Underground Library placement ads and they will be notified to use their NFC (Near Field Communication) devices to get a sample download of the best sellers,” she said.  “After they finish the first ten pages (and upon getting reception to their phone again), they will be notified of their closest library where they can borrow the book to finish it, in hope of bringing New Yorkers back to the library.”

Fun with Puns: Check out: The author made a pun. Check out means both to investigate, but also to borrow a book from a library.

It’s not just New Yorkers who need encouragement to check out their library again. According to the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy, the UK had 201 fewer libraries in 2011-2012 than the previous year, a drop of 4.5%. Visitor numbers to actual libraries and to library websites was also down, falling year-on-year by 2.4% and 14.4% respectively. Physical visits to libraries in the US decreased 1.1% in 2010, according to the American Library Association.

New technology, and keeping on top of it, is critical to libraries. The American Library Association’s 2012 state of the libraries report found that the rapid growth of e-books has stimulated increasing demand for them in libraries, but libraries only have limited access to e-books because of restrictions placed on their use by publishers. What the students’ promotion hinges on is something called Near Field Communication (NFC). Ms Tan explained how it works.

“Most of the new android phones have this function – they are able to transfer information onto their phone with other NFC devices,” she said. “Communication can also happen between a NFC device and an unpowered NFC chip called a ‘tag’. NFC enabled phones would be able to communicate with the RFID tag (radio frequency identification tags) placed within the subway ads. The content would directly transfer to your phone upon contact. No WiFi or server is needed at the subway.”

While the group’s project has not reached the implementation stage, Ms Tan says they see a future for using this type of technology in places where people are ‘stranded’ with no Internet access.

“There are a lot of institutions and brands that can benefit from a similar campaign – such as Barnes and Noble – different booksellers/publishing companies – or even Amazon E-books for Kindle Readers  – they can directly buy and download the entire book.”

People riding on public transport more often than not have their noses buried in a newspaper, book or e-reader. The Underground Library gives Smartphone readers the opportunity to take a chance on a new book, and if they get hooked, sends them to the right place to find out what happens next.

Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona

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