The Personal is Lyrical

Quite often our experience of art, from paintings to music, is public. We visit galleries or attend concerts with other people. However, a new opera by the Industry and LA Dance Project is using modern technology to create a more intimate artistic experience.

Confusing words: Attend vs. visit: We attend classes, concerts, meetings and gatherings; and visit galleries, museums and parks.

A club is another term for a disco, in fact it is the more popular term today.

Silent discos have used wireless headphones to give the disco patrons a more personal experience of being in a club because they can choose what music they are listening to. The Industry and LA Dance Project applies this technology to their opera Invisible Cities Opera.

Imagine you are at the train station and all of a sudden a trio of dancers starts writhing about on the floor. Or a fellow passenger waiting in the departures hall suddenly sings an aria out loud. Some people (the actual audience) are experiencing this even more intimately, freely walking around the station with headphones, having the music transmitted directly to them.

The director of The Industry, Yuval Sharon used Christopher Cerrone’s music and libretto based on the Italian novel, Invisible Cities written by Italo Calvino. The novel is a series of short descriptions of different cities Marco Polo claims to visit in Kublai Khan’s China. The descriptions are mostly fictitious. Choreographer Danielle Agami designed the dance and an incredibly talented team of sound engineers designed the sound.

Exclamatory sentences: Why: We use the interrogative pronouns – what, how, why – when we want to make an exclamation. ‘What a wonderful day!’ ‘How beautiful!’ ‘Why, my friend!’

Where would you host a performance of this fantasy-like story of travel and imagining new places? Why Los Angeles’ Union Station of course. The train station is a beautiful mix of Spanish Colonial Revival and Mission Moderne architecture and has travertine marble walls, terra cotta tile and marble floors and enclosed garden patios on either side of the waiting room.

Invisible Cities Opera got great reviews last fall. Public art and the use of public space for the public good is a concept I’m very fond of and this opera has it all. Audience members can freely explore the station, discovering the dancers and singers as they wish. Wearing headphones is an especially isolating experience. You are in your head, listening to something no one else can hear. Singers and dancers are confronted with their audience in a new way, as well as people unknowingly walking across the ‘stage.’ Casual passersby are also important; they add to both the audience and performers’ experience simply by being there. The interaction of it all adds up to a highly private experience in a very public space.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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The Personal is Lyrical Quiz: Medium

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Confusing words: Attend vs. visit: We attend classes, concerts, meetings and gatherings; and visit galleries, museums and parks.

Quite often our experience of art, from paintings to music, is public. We visit galleries or attend concerts with other people. However, a new opera by the Industry and LA Dance Project is using modern technology to create a more personal artistic experience.

The Industry and LA Dance Project uses wireless technology in their opera Invisible Cities Opera to give the audience a more personal experience.

The director of The Industry, Yuval Sharon used Christopher Cerrone’s music and libretto based on the Italian novel, Invisible Cities written by Italo Calvino. The novel is a series of short descriptions of different cities Marco Polo claims to visit in Kublai Khan’s China. The descriptions are mostly fictitious. Choreographer Danielle Agami designed the dance and an incredibly talented team of sound engineers designed the sound.

Exclamatory sentences: Why: We use the interrogative pronouns – what, how, why – when we want to make an exclamation. ‘What a wonderful day!’ ‘How beautiful!’ ‘Why, my friend!’

Where would you host a performance of this fantasy-like story of travel and imagining new places? Why Los Angeles’ Union Station of course. The train station is a beautiful mix of Spanish Colonial Revival and Mission Moderne architecture and has travertine marble walls, terra cotta tile and marble floors and enclosed garden patios on either side of the waiting room.

Invisible Cities Opera got great reviews last fall. Wearing headphones is an especially isolating experience. You are in your head, listening to something no one else can hear. Singers and dancers are confronted with their audience in a new way, as well as people unknowingly walking across the ‘stage.’ Casual passersby are also important; they add to both the audience and performers’ experience simply by being there. The interaction of it all adds up to a highly private experience in a very public space.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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The Personal is Lyrical Quiz: Mild

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Most would agree cultural pursuits are personal in nature – I love art, not opera. But the experience of cultural is not so individual. Usually you are surrounded by others enjoying the same thing you are and that can have an effect on your experience. As technology continues to offer new opportunities to forward-thinking people, cultural interests are not being left behind.

Making a public performance a private experience is becoming more and more possible thanks to technology. Think of silent discos. The club trend has been around for a few years. Music is pumped to listeners via wireless headphones. They generally have at least two channels from which to choose music from so it also personalizes the experience a bit – so even if they’re not dancing to their own unique tune, they’re not dancing to everyone else’s. An inventive dance company from Los Angeles has taken that idea and enhanced it – not only by applying it to opera, but also creating a public art form.

The Industry and LA Dance Project created the Invisible Cities Opera. Imagine you are at the train station and all of a sudden a trio of dancers starts writhing about on the floor. Or a fellow passenger waiting in the departures hall suddenly bellows out an aria. Some people (the actual audience) are experiencing this even more intimately, freely wandering the station with headphones, having the score transmitted directly to them.

Exclamatory sentences: Why: We use the interrogative pronouns – what, how, why – when we want to make an exclamation. ‘What a wonderful day!’ ‘How beautiful!’ ‘Why, my friend!’

The director of The Industry, Yuval Sharon used Christopher Cerrone’s music and libretto based on the Italian novel, Invisible Cities written by Italo Calvino. He then got choreographer Danielle Agami to design a corresponding dance and put together an insanely talented team of sound engineers. But to make this production truly unique, he needed an impressive venue. Invisible Cities is a work of fiction framed as a series of discussions between Marco Polo and Chinese ruler Kublai Khan as the explorer describes the different cities he has apparently visited in Khan’s empire. In fact many of these descriptions are the products of Polo’s imagination. Where would you host a performance of this fantasy-like story of travel and imagining new places? Why a train station of course.

Idiom: To leave a lot to be desired: Unsatisfactory

Los Angeles’ Union Station is a beautiful place. Opened at the end of the 1930s, the style is a mix of Spanish Colonial Revival and Mission Moderne architecture and has travertine marble walls, terra cotta tile and marble floors and enclosed garden patios on either side of the waiting room. As a performance venue it probably leaves a lot to be desired, but there is space to wander for the audience, space to spread out for the dancers, and the element of a surprise, almost like a flash mob for those just waiting for a train.

Ran to (good / bad / rave / terrible) reviews: To receive certain reviews during a performance’s season.

Invisible Cities Opera ran to great reviews for about three weeks last fall. Public art and the use of public space for the public good is a concept I’m very fond of and this opera has it all. Audience members are free to explore the station, discovering the dancers and singers as they wish. Wearing headphones is a singularly isolating experience. You are in your head, listening to something no one else can hear. Singers and dancers are confronted with their audience in a new way, as well as random people unknowingly walking across the ‘stage.’ Casual passersby are also important; they add to both the audience and performers’ experience simply by being there. The interaction of it all adds up to a highly private experience in a very public space.

Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona

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