Thrill Seekers Need Apply

Are you an adrenaline junkie? Why do you think that is? People who love to bungee jump, parachute or do other death-defying activities in the name of fun always seem to be looking for the next thrill. Matthew Barlow, Tim Woodman, and Lew Hardy from Bangor University decided to find out why.

Slang: Adrenaline junkie: Typically the word junkie is used to refer to someone addicted to drugs. Nowadays, the word is often used for someone who must do something, so an adrenaline junkie must do dangerous sports.

Past research on why people decide it would be a good idea to jump out of an airplane has centered on sensation seeking. But the three men thought there was more to it and set about doing some interrelated studies to challenge that theory. They came up with three motivations: sensation seeking, emotion regulation and agency scale. Emotion regulation is a person’s ability to understand and accept their emotional experiences and engage in appropriate behavior. Agency scale is how a person thinks about their experience.

Once they had increased the number of motives based on the results from their first study, they applied this new idea to two different thrill-seeking activities: skydiving and mountaineering. They chose these because while they are both thought of as high-risk, they are very different. Skydiving is an example of the sensation seeking model while mountaineering is concerned with the emotion regulation and agency model.

The study involved mountaineers, sky-divers and a low-risk control group – people who had regularly participated in a low-risk sport such as golf, basketball or running. The participants were then given a survey to fill out before, during and after participating in an activity. As the researchers had thought,  skydivers  showed  a greater need for sensation (before), a greater experience of sensation  (during)  and  a  greater  satisfaction  of  sensation  need  (after) than both mountaineers and the low-risk group. The latter groups were not so different on the sensation seeking factors. When it came to emotion regulation, no groups displayed major differences before the activity, however, both mountaineers and skydivers reported greater emotion regulation during the activity.

The greatest takeaway from this study is what the researchers discovered about the mountaineers. They believe they have greater emotion regulation and agency expectation in everyday life which is a new consideration in understanding the motivation that drives individuals who repeatedly go looking for bigger and better achievements.

Human enterprise: In this collocation, human enterprise means human activity.

The authors’ stated goal was to challenge the view that all high-risk activities are the same and motivated simply by sensation seeking. They hope researchers will re-evaluate risk takers as a homogenous sensation-seeking group and begin reflecting on risk taking as a potential model of human enterprise.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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Thrill Seekers Need Apply Quiz: Medium

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Slang: Adrenaline junkie: Typically the word junkie is used to refer to someone addicted to drugs. Nowadays, the word is often used for someone who must do something, so an adrenaline junkie must do dangerous sports.

Are you an adrenaline junkie? Why do you think that is? People who love to bungee jump, parachute or do other death-defying activities in the name of fun always seem to be looking the next thrill. Matthew Barlow, Tim Woodman, and Lew Hardy from Bangor University decided to find out why.

Past research on why people decide it would be a good idea to jump out of an airplane has centered on sensation seeking. But the three men thought there was more to it and set about doing some interrelated studies to challenge that theory. They had three motivations: sensation seeking, emotion regulation and agency scale. Emotion regulation is a person’s ability to understand and accept their emotional experiences and engage in appropriate behavior. Agency scale is how a person thinks about their experience.

Once they had increased the number of motives based on the results from their first study, they applied this new idea to two different thrill-seeking activities: skydiving and mountaineering. They chose these because while they are both thought of as high-risk, they are very different. Skydiving is an example of the sensation seeking model while mountaineering is concerned with the emotion regulation and agency model.

The greatest takeaway from this study is what the researchers discovered about the mountaineers. They believe they have greater emotion regulation and agency expectation in everyday life which is a new consideration in understanding the motivation that drives individuals who repeatedly go looking for bigger and better achievements.

The authors’ goal was to challenge the view that all high-risk activities are the same and motivated simply by sensation seeking. They hope researchers will re-evaluate risk takers as a homogenous sensation-seeking group and begin thinking about risk taking as a potential model of human enterprise.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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Thrill Seekers Need Apply Quiz: Mild

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Slang: Adrenaline junkie: Typically the word junkie is used to refer to someone addicted to drugs. Nowadays, the word is often used for someone who must do something, so an adrenaline junkie must do dangerous sports.

Are you an adrenaline junkie? Why do you think that is? People who love to bungee jump, parachute or do other death-defying activities in the name of fun always seem to be looking for the next big buzz – something newer, scarier. What motivates them? Is it the thrill, the high? Matthew Barlow, Tim Woodman, and Lew Hardy from Bangor University decided to find out.

Past research on why people decide it would be a good idea to jump out of an airplane has centered on sensation seeking. But the three men thought there was more to it and set about conducting a number of interrelated studies to challenge that theory. They came up with three motivations: sensation seeking, emotion regulation and agency scale. Emotion regulation refers to a person’s ability to understand and accept their emotional experiences and engage in appropriate behavior. Agency scale is how one processes human experience and especially how a person regards their control over events that effect their life.

Once they had broadened the motives based on the results from their first study, they applied this new idea to two distinct thrill-seeking activities: skydiving and mountaineering. They chose these because while they are both considered high-risk, they are very different. Skydiving appears to typify the sensation seeking model while mountaineering is concerned with the emotion regulation and agency model. Focusing on two well-defined sports was considered important because many high-risk activities would share some characteristics of both models and thus would cloud any potential differences between the two theoretical models.

The study involved mountaineers, sky-divers and a low-risk control group – people who had regularly participated in a low-risk sport such as golf, basketball or running. The participants were then given a survey to fill out before, during and after participating in an activity. As the researchers had supposed, skydivers displayed a greater need for sensation (before), a greater experience of sensation  (during)  and  a  greater  satisfaction  of  sensation  need  (after) than both mountaineers and the low-risk group. The latter groups didn’t differ much on the sensation seeking factors. When it came to emotion regulation, no groups displayed major differences before the activity, however, both mountaineers and skydivers reported greater emotion regulation during the activity. Again, while participating, mountaineers and skydivers also reported greater experience of agency. Mountaineers also experienced greater emotion regulation after the activity than skydivers and the low-risk group.

Domain is an area of activity

The greatest takeaway from this study is what the researchers discovered about the mountaineers. They believe they have greater emotion regulation and agency expectation in everyday life which is a new consideration in understanding the motivation that drives individuals who repeatedly go looking for bigger and better achievements. The authors wrote that ‘it appears that such individuals are less satisfied with their lot and seek in the high-risk domain a means of achieving more from life. Individuals with such high expectations of themselves likely stand to have either a very fulfilling life or a very unfulfilling life, with little in the way of achievement middle ground.’

Human enterprise: In this collocation, human enterprise means human activity.

The authors’ stated goal was to challenge the view that all high-risk activities are the same and motivated simply by sensation seeking. They hope researchers will re-evaluate risk takers as a homogenous sensation-seeking group and begin reflecting on risk taking as a potential model of human enterprise.

Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona

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Thrill Seekers Need Apply Quiz: Spicy

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