Waterlogged in Ukraine

A couple of years ago some friends and I went on a hiking trip in Ukraine. This was going to be more difficult than other trips we had been on. We were going to be in the Carpathians for a week and would have to carry most of our food and water and all our camping equipment for the week.

The future in the past: When we’re telling a story set in the past, we use ‘would’ or ‘was / were going to’ to show intended, future actions falling from a future point

Why Ukraine? Several friends of mine had been and I was impressed with their stories of the country’s beauty. We started our hike at a timber station. Above us our destination rose, covered with trees. By the end of the day, we would be up on one of those ridges. It had been a while since I’d been on such a long hike and was eager to get started.

Dip, as used in this article, means a short swim

The hiking route was quite well-prepared. Markers guided our way along clear paths. Around lunchtime we stopped by a river for a dip and a short rest in. It was not until a couple hours later we started really climbing the mountain.

We finally made it to our camping point in a meadow up on the ridge. There had only been one small disaster. I accidently stepped into a creek and boot filled with water and my foot was completely wet. Hopefully my boot would be dry tomorrow when we would start our way up Velka Syvula.

Unfortunately the boot wasn’t dry. The next morning we were woken by about 20 horses which were grazing around us. I thought they would walk through our tents but three dogs appeared and chased the horses away.

The bottom of a shoe and the bottom of your foot are both called ‘sole’

Soon we were on our way up Velka Syvula. My wet boot was making the climb uncomfortable and I was upset I hadn’t brought a second pair. As we continued walking, the bottom of my boot came loose. I was 80kms away from the nearest town and the only way out of the mountains was the way I came, on foot. One of my companions helped me make a strap from my tent’s guy lines. It worked, but I had to keep fixing it for the whole hike. And I had a large blister on my foot from the moisture which remained in my boot for the whole trip.

The rest of the hike remained quite demanding. Even with the shoe problems I had time to enjoy the spectacular scenery and the isolation that only the wilderness brings. I’ll definitely go back, only next time I’ll be more careful where I step.

Original article by Ryan Scott – Sydney, Australia. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

Waterlogged in Ukraine Quiz: Medium

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A couple of years ago some friends and I went on a hiking trip in Ukraine. We were going to be in the Carpathians and had to carry our food and water and all our camping equipment for the week.

The author used past perfect and past simple in one sentence: ‘Several friends of mine had been and I was impressed with their stories of the country’s beauty.’ Shows which action happened first (past perfect) and which followed (past simple).

Why Ukraine? Several friends of mine had been and I was impressed with their stories of the country’s beauty. We started our hike at a timber station. Above us our destination rose, full of trees. By the end of the day, we were on the top of the mountain. I hadn’t been on such a long trip for a very long time. The hiking route was quite well-prepared. Around lunchtime we stopped by a river for a dip and a short rest. And then we started really climbing the mountain.

We finally got to our camping point in a meadow up on the ridge. There was one small disaster. I accidently stepped into a creek. My boot filled with water and my foot was completely wet. Unfortunately the boot wasn’t dry the next morning when we were woken by about 20 horses. They were grazing around us but then three dogs appeared and chased the horses away.

Soon we were on our way up Velka Syvula. My wet boot was making the climb uncomfortable and I was upset because I didn´t bring a second pair. As we continued walking, the bottom of my boot came loose. I was 80kms away from the nearest town and the only way out of the mountains was the way I came, on foot. Besides I had a large blister on my foot.

Although the hike was quite demanding I had time to enjoy the beautiful scenery and the isolation that only the wilderness brings. I’ll definitely go back, only next time I’ll be more careful where I step.

Original article by Ryan Scott – Sydney, Australia. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

Waterlogged in Ukraine Quiz: Mild

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A couple of years ago some friends and I went on a hiking trip in Ukraine. We had been on a few hiking trips before but this one, as I was soon to find, was more demanding than most. We were going to be in the Carpathians for a week, and while it certainly wasn’t the Himalayas or Andes, we were going to have to carry most of our food and water and all our camping equipment for the week.

The future in the past: When we’re telling a story set in the past, we use ‘would’ or ‘was / were going to’ to show intended, future actions falling from a future point.

Why Ukraine? Several friends of mine, including one of my companions on this trip, had been and all impressed me with their stories of the country’s rugged and wild beauty. The section of the Carpathians where we would be hiking was heavily forested and according to the map there were enough springs and rivers to replenish our water supplies.

Reside is to live somewhere permanently. It sounds very official and we use it more for communities than individuals

Our journey started a little outside the town Ust-Chorna, a sleepy hamlet on one bank of the fast flowing but shallow Teresva River. The town had once been part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and in German is still known as Konigsfeld. A remnant of the former German history still resided in the town in the form of Franz, a 70-year-old descendant of German settlers. He was a friend of my companions and helped us get some supplies before the hike.

Franz also organized a lift from Ust-Chorna, so we didn’t have to waste a day walking along 30km of dilapidated pot-holed roads. But we did have a hair-raising few minutes as our driver swerved to avoid the craters in the road, and the on-coming traffic which were trying to avoid the same giant holes.

We started our hike further up the river at a timber station. Above us our destination rose, bristling with trees. By the end of the day, we would be up on one of those ridges. It had been a while since I’d been on such a long hike and was eager to get started.

The hiking route was quite well-prepared. Markers guided our way along smoothed clear paths. Around lunchtime with the sun high and hot above us we stopped by a river for a dip and a short rest in the shade of a tree. It was not until a couple hours later we started our real ascent.

As I said, it had been a while since I’d been on such a hike and with about 20kg on my back; I was beginning to feel every step. Even so, we made it to our camping point in a meadow up on the ridge. There had only been one small disaster. I’d misjudged the depth of a creek running across our path a little while earlier. My foot went right into the water, filling my boot and soaking my foot. Hopefully my boot would dry by tomorrow when we would start our way up Velka Syvula.

Unfortunately it wasn’t. But the next morning, that was the least of our worries as we were woken by about 20 horses which were grazing around us. Some were even getting very friendly with each other and didn’t seem to mind that they were near our campsite, stepping through the ashes of last night’s fire. I thought our tents would be next until three dogs appeared from the undergrowth and chased the horses away.

The dogs were tiny. The biggest was about the size of a small collie, the smallest was no bigger than a rabbit.  But these terrors frightened away our randy intruders, the largest launching himself on one horse and grabbing its tail in its mouth. Clearly no one had pointed out the size difference between the horses and their guardians.

When you are thinking things quietly in your head, or telling someone what you were thinking, we use this construction: I said to myself, I cursed myself, I thought to myself.

After the morning performance we were on our way up Velka Syvula. The moisture in my boot was making the climb uncomfortable and I was cursing to myself for not bringing a second pair. The curse became vocal when we made our descent and my boot’s sole came loose. There I was, 80kms away from the nearest town and the only way out of the mountains was the way I came, on foot. One of my companions devised a strap from my tent’s guy lines. I went through quite a lot of line by the time we got back down. To make matters worse, I had a large blister running down the sole of my foot from the moisture which remained in my boot for the whole trip.

Suffice to say the remainder of the hike remained quite demanding. I was forever stopping to adjust the sole; to stop it breaking off entirely. Yet despite this I had time to take in the spectacular scenery and enjoy the isolation that only the wilderness brings. I’ll definitely go back, only next time I’ll be more careful where I step.

Ryan Scott – Sydney, Australia

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