You are Invited…

I love a dinner party. I like to cook and prefer to enjoy my friends company in my home then at some impersonal restaurant. Yes, it’s a lot of work, and every time I do it, I tell myself it’s the last time, but then I get the urge once again…

Dinner parties come in all shapes and sizes. Most formal dinner parties take place at a dining table. Often a cocktail hour happens beforehand in a separate room. Among some groups of friends, the dinner parties are very organized and everyone takes turns hosting the dinner and preparing the food. Some people choose to do buffets, so people can socialize while they eat. For a very casual dinner, you can have a potluck, which means everyone brings a dish.

Dish can be both a plate and the food on it.

“For me it’s a labor of love; cooking for my friends, and the conversation is important,” Monica Angelucci, an American yoga instructor who lives in Prague told The Word. “It is a way to connect with my friends and connect them to each other.”

Ms Angelucci hosts dinner parties about every two to three months. She prepares the main course and asks guests to bring wine and dessert.

To be yourself means that you act natural.

“It’s always a sit down meal – that’s the gathering space around the table,” she said. “I want to create an environment where people can be themselves and that means no pretentious people, no intellectual snobs or boring people.”

Gabi Logan runs the website The 30 Minute Dinner Party. She believes it has become more popular again for one person to cook dinner in their home for their friends. At her parties; she plans and prepares the whole menu and hosts between 15 and 20 dinners a year.

“Cooking has become more accessible; you can watch on YouTube how to prepare something and it gives people confidence to try interesting foods,” she told The Word.

She has a number of tips for those looking to organize a dinner party. She suggests asking guests about any dietary requirements and designing a good seating plan – including making little note cards ‘introducing’ people’s seatmates to each other and a shared interest. As for the number of guests, Ms Logan believes it depends on your cooking competence and the space in your house. But eight is a good number to start with.

Today most people keep connected through Facebook pages or meeting for a beer or coffee. But gathering people together for a meal in your home is much more intimate. The results will be more rewarding for everyone than arranging a night out at a pub.

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Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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I love dinner parties because they are more personal than restaurants. Yes, it’s a lot of work, and every time I do it, I tell myself I’ll never do it again, but then I get the desire

Dinner parties can be very different. Some are very formal and people sit at a table. Others are buffets so people can talk and meet different people while they eat. For a very casual dinner, you can have each guest bring some food. This is called potluck.

A labor of love is something done purely for enjoyment. Remember in the UK it is spelled labour.

“For me it’s a labor of love; cooking for my friends, and the conversation is important,” Monica Angelucci, an American yoga instructor who lives in Prague told The Word. “It is a way to connect with my friends and connect them to each other.”

Ms Angelucci hosts dinner parties about every two to three months. She prepares the main course and asks guests to bring wine and dessert.

“I want to create an environment where people can be themselves and that means no pretentious people, no intellectual snobs or boring people,” she said.

Gabi Logan runs the website The 30 Minute Dinner Party. She believes it is more popular again for one person to cook dinner in their home for their friends.

“Cooking has become more accessible; you can watch on YouTube how to prepare something and it gives people confidence to try interesting foods,” she told The Word.

She has some tips for people who want to organize a dinner party. She said that you should find out what your guests can and cannot eat. Also you should make cards with each person’s name, so people can get to know each other.

When people meet together for a meal in a home, it is much more intimate. The results are better than just going to a pub.

Original article by Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona. Text edited by The Word’s methodology team

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The menu, the guests, the planning, shopping and most importantly – the cooking. Well, I guess the eating as well. I love a dinner party. I like to cook and would much prefer to enjoy my friends company in my home then at some impersonal restaurant. Yes, it’s a ton of work, and every time I do it, I swear it’s the last time, but then I get the urge once again…

‘Ton’ is used with many uncountable abstract nouns, such as time or respect, and it means a lot.

I probably have a romantic notion of dinner parties. I read a lot of books and those set in the 19th or even early 20th centuries have given me a glamorized image of what a true dinner party should be. A variety of courses, fine china, a carefully chosen guest list with arranged seating, stimulating conversation and excellent wine followed by brandy and cigars in another room. My little soirees never live up to that vision of dinner party ideal – on occasion I’ve asked friends to bring along some extra silverware or their own wine glasses as my meager supply didn’t extend to the number of guests I exuberantly invited. And gatherings on my living room floor have happened probably just as much as everyone properly seated around the table.

My Victorian dinner party ancestors would be aghast. At the most formal dinner parties, dinner is served on a dining table with place settings; often preceded by a cocktail hour in a separate room. Some people choose to do buffets with people munching and mingling throughout the evening. Or for a totally casual affair, some people invite others for a potluck with everyone contributing a dish to share. Dinner parties also come in more organized forms with a group of friends (typically four or six couples) rotating dinner in their homes on a regular basis. Sometimes the host prepares all the food, and sometimes each couple brings a course. While many people may not have the time, energy or funds to lay out a formal spread, the idea of opening your home to friends is culturally nothing new and still happening in dining rooms around the world.

“For me it’s a labor of love; cooking for my friends, and the conversation is important,” Monica Angelucci, an American yoga instructor who lives in Prague told The Word. “It is a way to connect with my friends and connect them to each other.”

Ms Angelucci hosts dinner parties about every two to three months and her chosen style is to prepare the main course and ask guests to contribute wine and dessert. She places emphasis on the dining table.

“It’s always a sit down meal – that’s the gathering space around the table,” she said. “I want to create an environment where people can be themselves and that means no pretentious people, no intellectual snobs or boring people.”

The menu isn’t much of a concern – she considers her guests’ dietary requirements, and then browses the shops for what looks fresh or interesting to her. Food it seems is not so much the point for dinner parties – the people and the connections are.

Gabi Logan runs the website The 30 Minute Dinner Party. She believes there has been a resurgence in having one person cook dinner in their home for their friends. At her parties; she plans and prepares the whole menu and hosts between 15 and 20 dinners a year.

“Cooking has become more accessible; you can watch on YouTube how to prepare something and it gives people confidence to try interesting foods,” she told The Word. “Many people aren’t brave or confident enough to try it but the results are so gratifying.”

She has a number of tips for those looking to take the big dinner party step including asking guests about any dietary requirements and designing a good seating plan – including making little note cards ‘introducing’ people’s seatmates to each other and a shared interest. As for the number of guests, Ms Logan believes it depends on your cooking competence and the space in your house. She says eight is a good number to start, but base it on your comfort level.

“The big obstacles I hear are cooking, cleaning and utensils – those aren’t the important things, it’s the gathering – not the food but your warmth and the excitement people feel after being invited to your home,” she said.

Keeping connected these days is often limited to monitoring your friend’s Facebook page or in a fit of friendliness meeting them for an after work drink or weekend coffee. But for a sense of fun and intimacy, gather people together for a meal in your home. The results will be more rewarding for everyone than arranging a night out at a pub.

Jacy Meyer – Phoenix, Arizona

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2 Responses to “You are Invited…”

  1. V poslední větě je překlep… místo “than” je “then”

  2. Thank you Jana! The Medium and Spicy versions have been updated to reflect the change.

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